E.E.C.A

TV-obsessed, book loving, feminist and writer
onegirlinalltheworld:

let me explain you a thing about these books.
these are the first two books in the engelfors trilogy, written by sara b elfgren and mats strandberg. they follow the lives of six young girls with newfound magical powers, and the evils that they have been chosen to defeat.
if you’re following me, there’s a pretty good chance that these books have literally everything you want. girls who love their families, girls who are afraid of becoming their mothers, girls who are struggling to get by on their own. girls who are friends with each other. girls who are in love with each other. girls with complicated relationships, girls who respect each other, girls who understand each other. girls who study and girls who party - girls who are treated with equal respect by the narrative. girls who cry. girls who sweat. 
and that’s not even touching on most of the plot points. magic and mentors, teenage rebellion, body-switching, familiars, villains of ambiguous morality… it’s all just really, really good, and you should read it.
these books are followed by a third, the key, which has been released in sweden but not in canada or the US just yet (the first two are available - find them here!) but seriously, read these books. you won’t be disappointed.

onegirlinalltheworld:

let me explain you a thing about these books.

these are the first two books in the engelfors trilogy, written by sara b elfgren and mats strandberg. they follow the lives of six young girls with newfound magical powers, and the evils that they have been chosen to defeat.

if you’re following me, there’s a pretty good chance that these books have literally everything you want. girls who love their families, girls who are afraid of becoming their mothers, girls who are struggling to get by on their own. girls who are friends with each other. girls who are in love with each other. girls with complicated relationships, girls who respect each other, girls who understand each other. girls who study and girls who party - girls who are treated with equal respect by the narrative. girls who cry. girls who sweat. 

and that’s not even touching on most of the plot points. magic and mentors, teenage rebellion, body-switching, familiars, villains of ambiguous morality… it’s all just really, really good, and you should read it.

these books are followed by a third, the key, which has been released in sweden but not in canada or the US just yet (the first two are available - find them here!) but seriously, read these books. you won’t be disappointed.

(via yourownspotlight)

casisinlovewithdean:

The reason why Harry wasn’t chosen for Ravenclaw was because he tried to catch the Hogwarts letters from the air instead of taking one from the fucking floor.

(via kyrstin)

karigan-gladheon:

Though I still consider making a series of posts to highlight shows/books that are similar to GoT but far superior because more feminist.

Would anybody be interested in that?